A Guide for Fostering Change to Scale Up Effective Health Services

  • By: Implementing Best Practices (IBP) Consortium

Access to the Guide to Fostering Change to Scale Up Effective Health Services

Updated in 2012, this practical guide helps health professionals scale up effective health services.

The Leadership, Management & Governance Project has chaired the Implementing Best Practices Initiative (IBP) for the past year. During this time, IBP’s Fostering Change for Scale Task Team has published a new guide based on the recognition that change is inevitable for survival and that directed and planned change has a much greater chance of success than ad hoc attempts to introduce new practices.

Change required to implement new practices and learning is difficult, and according to John Kotter of Harvard University, a high percent of change efforts fail.  Keeping this in mind, The Implementing Best Practices (IBP) Initiative, an international consortium of partners committed to scaling up what works in family planning and reproductive health, released an updated version of the “Guide to Fostering Change to Scale Up Effective health Services” during its annual meeting Dec 5-6 this year held at Abt Associates in Bethesda, MD. The IBP is currently chaired by Management Sciences for Health (MSH) through the USAID Leadership, Management, and Governance project. The guide is available on the Knowledge for Health (K4H) website (See access information below).  

The guide is based on the recognition that change is difficult, and that directed and planned change—rather than ad hoc attempts to introduce new practices—has a much greater chance of success.  It provides health practitioners with a practical way to successfully introduce change processes that will improve the availability and quality of services, expand utilization, and, ultimately, improve health outcomes.

Originally produced in 2007, the updated guide includes ideas based upon IBP partners’ learning and feedback from users over the last five years. New elements include: “Nine Steps and Beginning with the End in Mind” (from ExpandNet/WHO tools); “Improvement Collaborative Approach” (from University Research Co., LLC/USAID Health Care Improvement Project (HCI)); an enhanced section on leading change from MSH and; a stronger emphasis on monitoring of scale-up; and a more dynamic platform on the K4H website.